THE BOXER

Breed Standard

Breeder Referral

Coat Colors in Boxers and the ABC

History

Meet The Boxer

PUPPY INFORMATION
    Buying A Boxer Puppy

    Christmas Puppy - Why     It's a Bad Idea

    Crate Training

    Grooming
     Coat | Ears
     Nails | Teeth

    Puppy Agility For All
    Venues

    Training A Puppy For
    All The Rings

     Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3
     Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6

Rescue

Sports & Activities For The
Working Boxer

Your New Boxer
 

 

Breeder Referral

Among companion animals, boxers are unmatched in their devotion, loyalty and friendship to humankind. Anyone who has ever loved a bxer can attest to its hundred-fold return. The excitement your boxer shows when you come home, the wagging tail at the sound of the leash being taken from its hook, the delight in the tossing of a tennis ball, and the head nestled in your lap-those are only some of the rewards of being a boxer owner.

Owning a boxer is not just a privilege, it's a responsibility. These animals depend on us for, at minimum, food and shelter, and deserve much more. If you are considering taking a boxer into your life, you need to think seriously about the commitment that boxer ownership entails. If you already have a boxer, you need to consider if you are fulfilling all your obligations as its owner.

The ABC Breeder Referral is provided as a courtesy to potential buyers. The ABC does not recommend, guarantee, endorse, nor rate breeders, their kennels, or their stock. We also do not examine individual dogs. Buyers beware in all instances. Buyers should be certain to check all matters relating to registration, health claims, awards or certificates, Boxer quality (adult, puppy or otherwise), stud/puppy agreements with the breeders, sellers or stud owners before making any decision.

For more information on puppies available in your area, contact our Breeder Referral Chairman:

Rhonda Epley     Email: specialkboxers@butler-bremer.com      Phone: 319-239-2320

 

Find a Responsible Breeder
     Excerpt from the AKC article Thinking of Buying a Puppy? Find a Responsible Breeder

  • To find a responsible breeder, go to a dog show or visit the breed's Parent Club for additional resources and contact information.

  • Don't be put off if a breeder isn't immediately responsive. Hobby breeders often have full-time jobs and they don't always have available puppies. Be selective. Find a breeder who is knowledgeable and make sure you're comfortable with them.

  • Visit the breeder's home or kennel and ask to see at least one of the puppy's parents. Get an idea of what the future holds for your dog in terms of temperament and appearance.

  • Observe the premises. Is the house/kennel clean? Odor-free? Dogs and puppies should be clean, well fed, lively and friendly. Look for signs of malnutrition such as protruding rib cages or illness such as runny nose/eyes, coughing, lethargy and skin sores.

  • Pay attention to how the dogs and puppies interact with their breeder. Does the breeder appear to genuinely care for the puppies and their adult dogs? Both dogs and puppies should not shy away from the breeder and should be outgoing with strangers.

  • Find out about the health of your puppy and its parents. Breeders should be honest about the breed's strengths and weaknesses and knowledgeable about the genetic diseases that can affect their breed - including what's being done to avoid them. Breeders should be willing to share proof of health screenings such as OFA and CERF certificates with potential buyers.

  • Establish a good rapport with the breeder. He/she will be an excellent resource and breed mentor for you throughout the life of your puppy. You should be encouraged to call the breeder if your dog has a crisis at any stage of its life.

  • A responsible breeder may ask you to sign a contract indicating that if specified conditions of care are not met or you become unable to keep the puppy, he/she will reclaim it.

  • Don't expect to bring home the puppy until its eight to 12 weeks of age. Puppies need ample time to mature and socialize with its mother and littermates.

  • Breeders should be willing to answer any questions you have and should ask many of you as well. Breeders will want to make sure their puppies are going to good homes, with people who know what to expect and have made all the necessary preparations.

  • Don't leave the premises without the appropriate documentation of the dog's pedigree, a.k.a. "papers". The words "American Kennel Club" as well as the AKC logo should be clearly visible. You'll need to send in this application form to register your dog with the AKC. Be wary of a breeder who refuses/hesitates to give you papers, wants to charge you more for AKC papers, offers papers from a registry other than the AKC, or tells you he/she will mail them to you at a later date.

 

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